A Day at Dottke

A Student's Day Is Spent In One Of Three Ways

Classes

9 Weeks

Classes meet for one quarter which means they are roughly 9 weeks long. They meet at the same time every day and include additional work outside of the normal meeting times. Typically, the only classes offered are Math and Science courses which need to meet for an extended period of time to cover course objectives that are difficult to replicate in a project-based learning setting. Grading for classes follows a more traditional model and hours worked are not tracked.

Seminars

2 - 8 Weeks

Seminars meet for anywhere from 2 – 8 weeks. Students can combine a seminar with an independent project to earn credit for a particular course or they can combine multiple seminars to earn credit. Seminars are designed to offer high interest course work that is many times designed around specific student requests. 

English

Storytelling in Song Lyrics
Design Lab
The Reflection of Popular Culture in Real Life
Finding Your Voice
Take a Hike
Forms of Comedy
The Hate U Give

8:00 – 9:00
Jeanine Daugherty
20 Hours
9/10/20 – 10/19/20

This seminar is for those who love writing song lyrics, poetry or raps. We will explore the ways that song writers create stories in songs. How do they combine lyrics and music to create a specific tone? How can we take a story and make it fit a song? Why do songwriters choose to tell stories? We will compare and contrast how lyricists and authors use story elements. Finally, we’ll have fun sharing and discussing the song stories that we enjoy.

9:00 – 10:00
Kayleigh Bitters
25 Hours
9/10/20 – 10/27/20

In this seminar, students will engage in the Design Thinking Process to plan, design, prototype, and market their own “product.” This quarter, students will be using recycled materials from around their home and give them a second life to create up-cycled works of art that can be submitted to our “virtual gallery.” Students will demonstrate their mastery of the Deeper Learning Competencies as they work collaboratively with one another, think outside of the box, provide and apply constructive feedback, and contribute independently to create amazing works of art for our “gallery.”

10:00 – 11:00
Kellen Lynch
25 Hours
9/10/20 – 10/27/20

This seminar focuses on the influence of popular culture in society and how, in return, society influences popular culture.
This seminar will include a wide variety of content could include (but is not limited to):
The Simpson’s lasting impact on society
Pop culture’s influence on language
The use of classic literature in popular culture

12:00 – 1:00
Kayleigh Bitters
25 Hours
9/10/20 – 10/27/20

In this seminar, students will engage in critical discussions on important topics surrounding current events and relevant issues. Some examples of topics may include race issues in America, economic divides in communities, disparity in the education system, and more. Students will engage in a variety of discussion formats and learn valuable skills in effective communication and citizenship. This class follows a similar format to the student club, Voice Over Thursdays, where students chose the prompt for the day and led their own group discussion without teacher interference. This seminar has the option to expand into a recurring podcast as students become comfortable.

1:00 – 2:00
Jeanine Daugherty
25 Hours
9/10/20 – 10/27/20

If you love enjoying the outdoors, this is the seminar for you. You will learn how a non-scientist went from simply wanting a place to walk in the woods with her dogs to wanting to know things like how native species of plants and animals are impacted by non-native/invasive plants and animals and what you can do about them. We will look at how others have been inspired by nature and how that inspiration was expressed through poetry, narrative, science and art.

2:00 – 3:00
Kellen Lynch
25 Hours
9/10/20 – 10/27/20

This seminar is focused on comedy, the types of comedy, and how comedy influences culture.

2:00 – 3:00
Erin Hanson-Baisley
25 Hours
9/10/20 – 10/27/20

Students will read the novel The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas and discuss social issues which arise in the work of fiction.Students will have the opportunity to explore how literature reflects experiences in our lives and can give us perspective, broaden our thinking about social issues, as well as offer options for action.

Science

Independent Project-Based Science

12:30 – 1:00
Jenny Olechowski and Michelle Burton
12 Hours
9/10/20 – 10/26/20

Students wishing to earn science credit through a project of their own choice should sign up for this seminar. Here students will work to:

1. Choose a science topic to learn about
2. Create a project designed to meet specific learning targets for the science credit
3. Work directly with a science teacher to plan individual projects, monitor progress, troubleshoot/tune the project and complete project reflection documents.

Students will earn 1/2 science credit by completing = this seminar AND its corresponding science project.

US History

March to Freedom - The Civil Rights Movement of the 40s, 50s, and 60s
Environmental Ethics and History of Environmentalism
Voting Rights in America

8:00 – 9:00
Dave Stolpe
15 Hours
9/10/20 – 10/9/20

Students will explore the structure and manifestations of racial inequality in the United States and how those forces resulted in the Civil Rights Movement of the 40s, 50s, and 60s. We will examine historical forces that shaped opportunities and constraints for freedom struggles; the movement’s various philosophies, strategies, demands, and tactics; activism and ideologies.

8:00 – 9:00
Dave Stolpe
10 Hours
10/12/20 – 10/27/20

This seminar focuses on the human story of how we interact with our natural environment. Primarily will be exploring different human attitudes, philosophies, and beliefs, and how those mindsets impact the environment around us. We will examine significant events in the development of civilization that have significant impacts on the environment, and the policies and structures that have attempted to address those impacts.

A portion of this seminar will be in the form of a book study of Daniel Quinn’s novel Ishmael, using it as a lens with which to guide class discussion and examine how we came to be in the world we are in today, and to challenge student thinking about environmental issues.

10:00 – 11:00
Erin Hanson-Baisley
10 Hours
9/10/20 – 10/1/20

Students will learn how women, Native Americans, Latinos, and African Americans got the right to vote in the United States.

World History

Environmental Ethics and History of Environmentalism
World War 1 and World War 2

8:00 – 9:00
Dave Stolpe
10 Hours
10/12/20 – 10/27/20

This seminar focuses on the human story of how we interact with our natural environment. Primarily will be exploring different human attitudes, philosophies, and beliefs, and how those mindsets impact the environment around us. We will examine significant events in the development of civilization that have significant impacts on the environment, and the policies and structures that have attempted to address those impacts.

A portion of this seminar will be in the form of a book study of Daniel Quinn’s novel Ishmael, using it as a lens with which to guide class discussion and examine how we came to be in the world we are in today, and to challenge student thinking about environmental issues.

1:00 – 2:00
Phil Frahm
15 Hours
10/5/20 – 10/29/20

Students will define and describe key terms and events related to WWI and WWII and discuss the evolution of modern warfare.

Psychology

Psychological Disorders
Substances and the Brain
Understanding Trauma

9:00 – 10:00
Phil Frahm
15 Hours
9/10/20 – 10/9/20

Students will define and describe the most common psychological disorders.

It is recommended that this seminar be taken in conjuction with “Substances and the Brain”.

9:00 – 10:00
Phil Frahm
10 Hours
10/12/20 – 10/27/20

To learn about the effects of various substances on the brain and the body.

It is recommended that this seminar be taken in conjunction with the seminar “Psychological Disorders”

12:00 – 1:00
Dave Stolpe
10 Hours
10/12/20 – 10/27/20

In this seminar students will explore the impact of trauma on neurological and emotional development, including the historical and contemporary theories in the field, the nature of trauma (abuse, poverty, combat, and natural disasters), how trauma affects individuals and systems, grief reactions, and traumatic stress. We will also examine methods and behaviors to reduce the impact of trauma on the day to day lives of those who have been exposed to trauma.

Sociology

Environmental Ethics and History of Environmentalism
Culture and Counterculture

8:00 – 9:00
Dave Stolpe
10 Hours
10/12/20 – 10/27/20

This seminar focuses on the human story of how we interact with our natural environment. Primarily will be exploring different human attitudes, philosophies, and beliefs, and how those mindsets impact the environment around us. We will examine significant events in the development of civilization that have significant impacts on the environment, and the policies and structures that have attempted to address those impacts.

A portion of this seminar will be in the form of a book study of Daniel Quinn’s novel Ishmael, using it as a lens with which to guide class discussion and examine how we came to be in the world we are in today, and to challenge student thinking about environmental issues.

1:00 – 2:00
Phil Frahm
10 Hours
9/10/20 – 10/1/20

Students will define and describe culture and counterculture from a sociological perspective and analyze modern counterculture movements and how they affect society.

Government

Environmental Ethics and History of Environmentalism
Election 2020
A Walk Through the US Constitution

8:00 – 9:00
Dave Stolpe
10 Hours
10/12/20 – 10/27/20

This seminar focuses on the human story of how we interact with our natural environment. Primarily will be exploring different human attitudes, philosophies, and beliefs, and how those mindsets impact the environment around us. We will examine significant events in the development of civilization that have significant impacts on the environment, and the policies and structures that have attempted to address those impacts.

A portion of this seminar will be in the form of a book study of Daniel Quinn’s novel Ishmael, using it as a lens with which to guide class discussion and examine how we came to be in the world we are in today, and to challenge student thinking about environmental issues.

10:00 – 11:00
Erin Hanson-Baisley
15 Hours
10/5/20 – 10/29/20

Students will learn the fundamentals of the election process, the specifics of each race and the candidates both local, state and national. Students will learn how to register to vote and participate in our democratic process.

12:00 – 1:00
Dave Stolpe
15 Hours
9/10/20 – 10/9/20

Students will take a guided walk through the U.S. Constitution in order to explore the structures and safeguards our founding fathers put in place to foster and protect freedom and encourage the growth of a great nation. Students will be asked to select a specific constitutional topic to dig deeper into and present a history of that issue throughout America, as well as looking into what work might still need to be done.

Health

Human Performance
Emotional Health and Stress

8:00 – 9:00
Mike Lessard
25 Hours
9/8/20 – 10/27/20

This course is designed to help students develop proficiency, knowledge, and skills outside of the traditional Physical Education classroom environment. This course can be used for credit recovery or as an acceleration option. Graduation requirements include 1.50 credits in Physical Education. Mr. Lessard and the student will design a performance plan that will enable them to improve their fitness and health. The plan will include physical fitness activities, nutritional meal planning, and journaling. The student will earn a .50 (half) credit for completing a minimum of 45 hours of physical activity as part of their project. Students may utilize time/hours of physical activity for athletic training, dance, conditioning, aerobic activities, running, walking, etc. The 45 hours or more of physical activity is part of their deeper learning project and is overseen by Mr. Lessard. There will be an intentional focus on feedback and personal growth because we believe the process of learning is just as important as the outcomes. This framework will allow students to do work that matters to them while still learning the same content taught in the traditional Physical Education classroom but on a much deeper level. Mr. Lessard will meet regularly with the student as part of the project.

1:00 – 2:00
Mike Lessard
25 Hours
9/8/20 – 10/27/20

Emotional Health and Stress emphasis is on recognition of, and enhancing awareness about, how stress affects human health and performance. Stress management techniques such as relaxation, effective communication, cognitive-behavioral approaches, eating behaviors, regular exercise, and time management are explored.

Independent PE

Independent Physical Education – Human Performance
Take a Hike

10:30 – 11:00 or 2:00 – 2:30
Mike Lessard
12 Hours
9/10/20 – 10/27/20

This course is designed to help students develop proficiency, knowledge, and skills outside of the traditional Physical Education classroom environment. This course can be used for credit recovery or as an acceleration option. Graduation requirements include 1.50 credits in Physical Education. Mr. Lessard and the student will design a performance plan that will enable them to improve their fitness and health. The plan will include physical fitness activities, nutritional meal planning, and journaling. The student will earn a .50 (half) credit for completing a minimum of 45 hours of physical activity as part of their project. Students may utilize time/hours of physical activity for athletic training, dance, conditioning, aerobic activities, running, walking, etc. The 45 hours or more of physical activity is part of their deeper learning project and is overseen by Mr. Lessard. There will be an intentional focus on feedback and personal growth because we believe the process of learning is just as important as the outcomes. This framework will allow students to do work that matters to them while still learning the same content taught in the traditional Physical Education classroom but on a much deeper level. Mr. Lessard will meet regularly with the student as part of the project.

1:00 – 2:00
Jeanine Daugherty
25 Hours
9/10/20 – 10/27/20

This seminar can be used to fulfill 25 of the 45 hours required for earning Independent PE credit. The additional hours will be tracked and submitted to Mr. Lessard during the first quarter of the 2020/21 school year.

If you love enjoying the outdoors, this is the seminar for you. You will learn how a non-scientist went from simply wanting a place to walk in the woods with her dogs to wanting to know things like how native species of plants and animals are impacted by non-native/invasive plants and animals and what you can do about them. We will look at how others have been inspired by nature and how that inspiration was expressed through poetry, narrative, science and art.

Advisory

At Dottke, this is open-ended time that provides the space to build and create projects

Any time a student is not in a class, a seminar or at lunch, they are in Advisory working on individual or group projects. Projects can be assigned from classes and in conjunction with seminars, but can also be done outside of the scope of a class or seminar.